Welcome Home, SIS Alumni and Friends!

We recognize you are changing the world every day. Everywhere you go, you carry forward the name of the School of International Service, and you serve as our face to the world. Like every student who has ever passed through our doors, you recognize that service isn't a moment, it's a mindset. You've devoted your professional life to embodying this mindset and leading through service.

Your home is a beautiful, spacious, LEED-Gold certified building at the corner of Nebraska and New Mexico Avenues. The original SIS building is also still on campus and is now called the East Quad Building. So, be sure to let the Office of Alumni Relations know you're planning a trip back to campus so that we can greet you, coordinate a tour, and catch up with you over a cup of coffee at The Davenport Lounge. In the meantime, drop us an e-mail and tell us what you're doing. We want to hear from you.

Join other alumni located around the globe; there are communities around the world and events throughout the year. We look forward to engaging with you.

Thank you for your support and SIS spirit.

IF YOU HAVE 5 MINUTES:

IF YOU HAVE 10 MINUTES:

  • Inquire on ways you can mentor a SIS student looking for real-world, career-building advice and guidance.

IF YOU HAVE 30 MINUTES:

IF YOU HAVE AN HOUR:

  • Crash a Class with pizza and soda. Learn more by dropping us an email.

IF YOU HAVE A HALF DAY:

  • Assist in a career development workshop on networking, resume writing, and public speaking to name a few.
  • Host a Dinner with Alumni event at a restaurant. Current students will be invited to enjoy dinner and conversation with you.

IF YOU HAVE A DAY OR TWO:

  • Assist in the Undergraduate/Graduate Enrollment Management process as an alumni admissions volunteer. Represent SIS at local career fairs, interview potential students, attend a local prospective event, or serve on a Q & A panel at recruitment fairs.

IF YOU HAVE MORE THAN A YEAR:

  1. Read the SIS e-newsletter and American magazine
  2. Attend programs and events in your community (be sure to let us know how to find you to ensure you receive invites!)
  3. Follow AU and SIS on social media
  4. Participate in your local alumni community
  5. Submit a class note - it would be great to hear what you are up to these days
  6. Search for career opportunities, as well as post opportunities, on AU's CareerWeb
  7. Order your AU Alumni One Card to take advantage of alumni perks!
  8. Visit The Davenport Lounge during your next visit to campus - your first cup of joe is on us so be sure to drop us a line with the date and time you plan to visit
  9. Show SIS spirit by wearing the latest gear (stop by the AU bookstore and receive a discount with your AU Alumni One Card!)
  10. Meet up with classmates, faculty, and staff at All-American Weekend

SIS provides a range of graduate programs, including master’s degrees in a variety of international fields of study, an executive master’s degree program, cross-disciplinary joint and dual degrees, as well as a PhD in international relations. 

Add to your professional expertise or learn something new just for fun! Degree-holding alumni may audit one AU course per semester.

The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) is a non-profit organization affiliated with AU that offers educational opportunities for individuals who wish to remain intellectually active and involved.

Attend a panel discussion, lecture, or presentation on campus. Renowned practitioners and distinguished scholars frequently speak on a range of topics right here at SIS. To stay apprised of all upcoming events, subscribe to the SIS alumni e-newsletter by updating your contact information.

My experiences led me to advocate for increased visibility of female veterans.

After serving as an Arabic interpreter in Operation Iraqi Freedom for the US Army, I returned home to discover that people had no idea women were at war or in the military. This realization inspired me to champion the voices and needs of female veterans through activism and writing. I now direct the Center for Women Veterans at the US Department of Veterans Affairs, where I oversee health care, benefits, and a variety of programs for women who have served our country.

I conduct empirical research to help human trafficking victims.

I develop statistical models that track the location and vulnerability of human trafficking victims. When I started in this field, many anti-trafficking efforts were based on anecdotal evidence, which made estimating the actual location and number of victims difficult. So I decided to use statistics to help understand the scope and scale of the problem and to help target intervention efforts. As part of my work at the Walk Free Foundation, I recently co-authored the Global Slavery Index, which measures human trafficking in countries across the globe.